Archive for the advertising Category

Vintage ads for NWA solo albums (1992)

Posted in advertising, music, pop culture, rap with tags , , , on April 21, 2016 by Paxton

Here are some more scans from vintage hip-hop magazines.

Today I’m going to show you some ads for NWA member solo albums from late 1992.

Dr Dre The Chronic
Here’s an ad for Dre’s The Chronic from about a month before its release.

Ice Cube The Predator
Here’s an ad for Ice Cube’s The Predator from right before its release. In fact, the album may have already been released by the time the ad dropped.

Eazy E 5150
This ad is for Eazy-E’s 5150: home 4 tha sick EP. It had already been released when this ad ran. Note at the bottom the solicit for Eazy’s upcoming album, Temporary Insanity. That album was rumored for years and never released. I have no idea if the tracks are still out there or they were mostly used for the posthumous Str8 Off Tha Streets.

Advertisements

Nerd Lunch Episode 167: Drilldown on Infomercials

Posted in advertising, nostalgia, podcast, pop culture, TV, TV shows with tags , , , , , , on February 24, 2015 by Paxton

Nerd Lunch Podcast

This week we are joined by frequent guest Tim Lybarger from the Neighborhood Archive to talk all about infomercials.

Flowbee

We discuss some of our favorite products, some of our favorite pitchmen and then we spend a moment discussing some of the more ridiculous products we remember seeing info ads for. Also find out if any of us actually bought any of this crap. You’ll be surprised.

Download this episode from iTunes, Stitcher or listen to it on Feedburner.

Or listen to it online here.

AWESOME-tober-fest 2013: Four vintage Fangoria magazine ads

Posted in advertising, Fangoria, Halloween, holiday, magazine, movies, music with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 30, 2013 by Paxton

Awesometoberfest banner

Fangoria had a lot of great merch that you could purchase directly through the magazine. We saw the masks/costumes collections yesterday. Now let’s take a look at some of the other awesome items you could buy through the pages of Fangoria.

Fangoria Back Issues
One of the first places I’d usually go, and the place I usually lingered on after I’d read the magazine, is the two page back issue order form.  Checking out previous issues and what movies were covered was amazing.  I love that they included many of the covers as well.  You can see in the lower right I filled out the order form back in the day.  I was optimistically hoping my parents would let me send away for some of the issues.  I checked off issues #50 and #55 in the form.  Issue 50 was the issue featured in the picture on the right with Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund).  I always lusted after that issue and never got it.  The other issue, #55, I’m less sure why I wanted.  The cover pic is above the description with the Invaders from Mars remake on the cover and some first looks at Psycho III.

TX Tshirt Massacre
This ad showed up in Fangoria for many years.  One of my favorites.  I never wanted to own any of these shirts, I just liked the idea that they existed.  I would never have been able to wear one of these shirts to school, so what was the point?  Plus the shirts were $25 which was A LOT, even then.  But the ad was very eye catching and fun.  I like the guy in the luchador mask.  WTF?!

Music for Maniacs
Fangoria sold everything to make money within its pages. Here are some horror movie soundtracks for sale.  Some of these I would imagine are pretty rare now.  Some of these might possibly have been made custom.  That Troll soundtrack couldn’t have sold too well.  The Return of the Living Dead soundtrack is pretty great.  But check out that list of eclectic movie soundtracks on the right.  Teen Wolf?  Warhol’s Dracula?  The first Evil Dead? Transylvania 6-5000?!  Wow.

The Gore Store
The Gore Store was always a great stop in the magazine to see what cool books and props were being offered. This particular Gore Store is from 1987.  Some cool film books about Night of the Living Dead and Stephen King.  Also this page was a chance to order the annual Bloody Best of Fangoria issues.  In this one you could order all the current 5 volumes of Bloody Best right there for $18 plus shipping.  A little over $3 each.  Not bad.


2012 banner
Also, check out the blog Countdown to Halloween for more Halloween-y, bloggy AWESOMEness.

AWESOME-tober-fest 2013: Vintage Fangoria mask ads

Posted in advertising, Fangoria, magazine with tags , , , , , , , on October 29, 2013 by Paxton

Awesometoberfest banner

I’ve said before I’m a huge Fangoria fan.  I still have all my old issues.

Here are some awesome mask ads from Fangoria magazine.  Let’s put them in chronological order shall we?

First up:

Monster Madness
A Monster Madness makeup kit ad from 1979 featuring several different types of masks.  Three space alien designs, but check out C, on the far right.  Does it look familiar?  Maybe a bit like Darth Vader without the samurai helmet?  The ad says the kits were designed by Dick Smith, but his name isn’t anywhere in the branding.

Don Post masks
Ad for Don Post masks circa 1980. With the gear up to Empire Strikes Back that year, it’s not surprising that there are several Star Wars masks in this collection.  Including a Bith cantina band member.

Massacre Masks
Massacre Masks ad from 1987.  A fun ad showcasing not only masks but gaping wounds.  It was always preferrable at the time to want to buy the goriest thing you could find in these ads and then wear them around your parents or other family members.

Nightmare Masks
Nightmares masks ad from 1987.  More gory, disgusting mask designs.  Even back in the day I really liked the Letcher mask/hands in the upper left.  I’m also in love with that “The Coffin” prop in the lower left.  And the full size “The Corpse”?  Yes, please.  In 1987, those two items would set you back $875 plus shipping.

2012 banner
Also, check out the blog Countdown to Halloween for more Halloween-y, bloggy AWESOMEness.

Vintage ads for official movie magazines from the 80s

Posted in advertising, Fangoria, magazine, movies, nostalgia, pop culture with tags , , , , , on August 16, 2013 by Paxton

I’ve talked about movie magazines before.  As a matter of fact, back in 2010 I took a look at the Back to the Future souvenir magazine.  I love official movie magazines and I have a bunch of them.  These magazines were the original movie supplemental material.  We didn’t have DVDs and VHS tapes didn’t normally add anything extra (some did, but it was rare).  I remember seeing ads for these magazines all over my favorite magazines.  I’d fill out the form and select the ones I wanted as a wish list.  Just hoping that someday I’d be allowed to order a Rambo or Star Trek movie magazine through the mail.

So, I was perusing through my old Fangoria magazines recently and found a couple of these movie magazine ads.  They show a ton of the magazines and it’s great to see some of the covers.  So on this lazy Friday, I thought I’d show you this 80s vintage goodness.

This first ad is from 1986.

Movie mag ad 1

I love how the magazines are spread out like you took the pile and threw them on the table. Amazing layout.  There’s that amazing Rambo magazine.  They also have Rocky II, Rocky III and Rocky IV magazines.  As a matter of fact there are THREE Rocky IV magazines.  AND, Stallone gets a “Best Of” magazine.  Damn, he was at the height of his popularity here.  As for all the Rocky IV magazines, when a movie was popular enough, it would not only get an official movie magazine, it would also get an official poster magazine and an official “movie book”.  I put that last one in quotes because even though it’s called a book it was still a magazine, just with more content and glossier, color pages.

You can see some of the covers on this ad are for the poster magazines (Star Trek III, Rocky II for example).  Some of the other ones pictured that I think look cool include the A View to a Kill as well as The Explorers.  Take a look at the list in the yellow box at the bottom and there are listed several magazines that aren’t pictured.  Annie, Superman III, High Road to China, SF Superheroes, TV Superheroes, Joanie Loves Chachi and Conan the Destroyer.  I would buy every single one of these magazines today.

If I were to have ordered every magazine in this ad back in the day it would have set me back $75.35.  Plus $24.90 for shipping.  That’s $100.25 (incl shipping) for 26 different magazines.  Which is about $3.85 each.  NOT BAD.  It would cost well over that now to track this mess down on eBay and trader sites.

Continue reading

A Crystal Pepsi Retrospective on its 20th birthday

Posted in advertising, Pepsi, pop culture, soda with tags , , , , , on April 12, 2012 by Paxton

Sodapalooza

Today is the 20th birthday of Crystal Pepsi. So in honor of our see through friend, I thought I’d take a look back at one of the more maligned soda drinks of our time.

In the ’90s there was a movement within America that equated clarity with purity. Pepsi decided to jump on this trend and create a colorless decaffeinated soda. Pepsi hoped that people would notice a colorless soda above other darker sodas and think that it’s more pure due to it’s colorless appearance and assume it would have less artificial coloring. Pepsi dubbed their new soda Crystal Pepsi and released it and a diet version to 9 test markets in early 1992.

After the drink faired well in test markets, a huge marketing campaign was developed and Crystal Pepsi was released nationwide in April 1992 to huge fanfare. The commercials were shown during Super Bowl XXVII. The Van Halen single “Right Now” was used on the commercials and the tagline for the soda was, “You’ve never seen a taste like this!”

Many people don’t remember, but Crystal Pepsi did well the first year grabbing almost 1% of the soda market. It did well enough to cause Coca-Cola to develop and release Tab Clear in December 1992. In 1993, however, the interest waned. Crystal Pepsi didn’t taste any different than regular dark Pepsi, which confused people because clear colas usually have a citrus taste. Sales dropped off and Pepsi pulled it off shelves. It was quickly reformulated into Crystal by Pepsi which was still colorless, but had a citrus taste like everyone expected.

By then, though, the damage was done and Pepsi canceled the soda in America in late 1993 – 1994. Crystal Pepsi continued to sell well in Europe for another year or so but was eventually canceled there also. The Crystal Clear concept quickly became a joke and was mocked on late night talk shows and eventually in a classic Saturday Night Live commercial, Crystal Gravy (via Redux).

PepsiCo quickly moved on and Crystal Pepsi eventually became a shameful footnote in the company’s history (a la New Coke).  As a special promotion, however, Pepsi did release a Pepsi Clear in Mexico in 2005. Presumably, it used the same Crystal Pepsi formula.  I’m unsure if it had a citrus flavor or not.

More soda history:
1. Misunderstood: The Saga of New Coke
2. The Story of OK Soda
3. Pepsi Patio: The Secret Origin of Diet Pepsi

AWESOME-tober-fest 2011: Vintage vampire movie posters and ads

Posted in advertising, Dracula, monsters, movies, pop culture, vampires with tags , , , , , , , , on October 21, 2011 by Paxton

Awesometoberfest banner

This is the end of vampire TV week. Next week begins movie week. In celebration, I’m forgoing looking at a TV show today and I’m just going to present you with a potpourri of scary vintage movie ads featuring vampires. You can see more of these ads on my other blog Held Over.

First lets see some newspaper ads.

Dracula ad
This is a 1952 ad for a revival of the Dracula stage play. This was an adaptation of the Bram Stoker novel that originally ran in 1927 and starred Bela Lugosi. It was this adaptation that Universal remade for the 1931 film in which Bela reprized his stage role as the Count.

Bram Stoker's Dracula
This is a 1992 ad for Francis Ford Coppola’s rather indulgent adaptation of the Bram Stoker novel.

Love at First Bite
This ad is for Love at First Bite starring George Hamilton. It’s a 1979 spoof of Dracula that has the Count getting kicked out of his Transylvanian castle and having to move to America and blend in with the people of 70s New York.

Continue reading